Episode 77. Margaret Tynes (BHM2021 V)

Episode 77. Margaret Tynes (Black History Month 2021 V)

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For a special bonus episode this week (without the usual paywall!), I bring you the extraordinary soprano Margaret Tynes, who in September celebrated her 101st birthday! Tynes is a unique artist, fearlessly forging her own musical, dramatic, and vocal path, aided and abetted by a strong voice with a powerful top register. Though she made a number of significant appearances in her homeland earlier in her career (including an appearance in Duke Ellington’s jazz suite, A Drum Is a Woman), her later successes were focused primarily in Europe, where she was particularly celebrated for her extraordinary Salome, with which she created a sensation in Spoleto in 1961, and her Lady Macbeth. All these and more are featured on this episode, which also includes spirituals and Creole folk songs, as well as excerpts from Aida, Carmen, and Porgy and Bess. Guest artists include LeVern Hutcherson, most remembered today for his appearances on stage and screen in Porgy, and George Shirley, the first African American tenor to sing at the Metropolitan Opera.

RECORDINGS HEARD IN THIS EPISODE

Traditional Spiritual: Ev’rytime I Feel the Spirit. Margaret Tynes; Pál Varga, Orchestra of the Budapest Philharmonic Society [1962]

Joya Sherrill, Duke Ellington, and Margaret Tynes in A Drum Is a Woman (1956).

Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn: A Drum Is a Woman [Part One]. Margaret Tynes; Duke Ellington and His Orchestra [1956]

George Gershwin, DuBose Heyward, Ira Gershwin: Summertime (Porgy and Bess). Margaret Tynes; Orchestra conducted by Warren Edward Vincent [1960]

Brock Peters (1927 – 2005)

George Gershwin, DuBose Heyward, Ira Gershwin: I wants to stay here… I loves you, Porgy (Porgy and Bess). Margaret Tynes, Brock Peters; Paul Belanger, Opera Society Orchestra [1955]

LeVern Hutcherson (1905 – 1969)

George Gershwin, DuBose Heyward, Ira Gershwin: Porgy, I’s your woman now (Porgy and Bess). Margaret Tynes, LeVern Hutcherson; Orchestra conducted by Warren Edward Vincent [1960]

Margaret Tynes in Budapest

Giuseppe Verdi: L’insana parola, o Numi (Aida). Margaret Tynes; Pál Varga, Orchestra of the Budapest Philharmonic Society [1962]

Giuseppe Verdi: Or che d’amore (Aida). Margaret Tynes; Pál Varga, Orchestra of the Budapest Philharmonic Society [1962]

Georges Bizet: En vain pour éviter [Card Scene] (Carmen). Margaret Tynes; Unknown conductor and orchestra

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi: Cujus animam gementem (Stabat Mater). Margaret Tynes; Massimo Bruni, Prague Chamber Orchestra [1968]

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi: O quam tristis et afflicta (Stabat Mater). Margaret Tynes, Anita Turner-Butler; Massimo Bruni, Prague Chamber Orchestra [1968]

Traditional Creole:  Creole Nursery Song [Dansé, Conni, Conné]; Creole Lullaby [Fais dodo]. Margaret Tynes; János Gyulai Gaal, Hungarian Radio Orchestra [1962]

George Shirley (born 18 April 1934)

Richard Strauss: Ah! Herrlich! Wundervoll! (Salome). Margaret Tynes, George Shirley, Lili Chookasian; Thomas Schippers, Orchestra Filarmonica del Teatro Verdi di Trieste [live Spoleto 30 June 1961]

Lili Chookasian (1921 – 2012)

Richard Strauss: Du sprachst böse Worte gegen mich (Salome). Margaret Tynes; Pál Varga, Orchestra of the Budapest Philharmonic Society [1962]

Richard Strauss: Hättest du mich angeseh’n (Salome). Margaret Tynes, George Shirley, Lili Chookasian; Thomas Schippers, Orchestra Filarmonica del Teatro Verdi di Trieste [live Spoleto 30 June 1961]

Thomas Schippers (1930 – 1977)

Giuseppe Verdi: Gran Scena del Sonnambulismo (Macbeth). Margaret Tynes; Pál Varga, Orchestra of the Budapest Philharmonic Society [1962]

Margaret Tynes (born 11 September 1919), Nora Holt (1885 – 1974), William Warfield (1920 – 2002)

6 thoughts on “Episode 77. Margaret Tynes (BHM2021 V)”

  1. Absolutely wonderful program. The photographs so evocative of happy bygone days. Thank you for resurrecting happy memories of my own musical family and our shared love of African American classical musicians and history.

    1. It is my great honor. I am so happy to have provided you with happy memories! I hope you continue to enjoy the program! Best wishes, Daniel

    1. She could pretty much do it all! Thank you so much for listening (and Happy Birthday!)

  2. Thank you for this excellent podcast on Margaret Tynes. It was such a joy and pleasure to hear her in opera as well as wonderful recordings of folk songs and spirituals.
    She is truly an extraordinary artist.

    1. Hello, Althea, thank you so much for your positive response to the extraordinary artistry of the great Margaret Tynes! She made her own distinctive mark, and did so fearlessly!

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